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Advanced Masterclass
Trauma Informed Interventions
for Working with First Nations Clients: 
A Masterclass Ser
ies on Historical Trauma & Strategies Across the Life Span

with Shelley PomPana Spear Chief, Clinical MSW, RSW

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About me

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32 hours of content

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Intermediate/Advanced

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Psychologists, Social Workers, MFTs, graduate-level Counselors, Psychotherapists

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6 months access included

On-Demand
Self-Paced Learning

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01 Presentation
Working with complex traumatic grief within Indigenous First Nations Peoples: the shock of the unmarked graves

01 presentation

Pre-recorded to watch at your convenience
Available on video On-Demand (6 months access to the recording)

Description

Loss has been normalized amongst the Indigenous First Nations Peoples. The findings of the unmarked graves of Indigenous First Nation children are having a profound impact on First Nation people. This grief often creates a sense of disconnection from oneself and their relationship with others.

This live workshop is designed to give mental health therapists an increased understanding of the historical effects of grief and how it is now identified as complex complicated grief. This grief contributes to feelings of hopelessness, helplessness, worthlessness, and powerlessness. These feelings can lead to one dissociating and escaping the internal pain processes that result from continual and overwhelming environmental experiences.

Presenters will explain the concept of Two-Eyed Seeing and how this can allow westernized support workers to utilize traditional healing techniques and strategies to support the stabilization of individuals dealing with complex complicated grief.

Learning Objectives 

  • Relate how the historical effects of colonization have contributed to the inter transmission of grief from one generation to the next.

  • Relate the effects of the finding of the unmarked graves and how it has exacerbated the symptoms of complexed grief.

  • Detect the different types of grief experienced by Indigenous First Nation Peoples.

  • Identify obstacles in healing due to the enormous effects of suicide, opioid crisis, and covid pandemic.

  • Describe how traditional healing strategies can be combined with Westernized (Two-Eyed Seeing) approaches to support wellness.

  • Explain the importance of focusing on stabilization when working with complex grief.

  • Utilize three stabilization techniques to support grief

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(registered users only)

02 Presentation
Working with Codependent Clients Utilizing a Medicine Wheel Approach

Pre-recorded to watch at your convenience
Available on video On-Demand (6 months access to the recording)

Learning Objectives 

  • Definition of codependency

  • How to adapt codependency from an Indigenous lens

  • Identify the hidden barriers in the treatment plan to be culturally inclusive.

  • Design a treatment plan utilizing codependency material that will integrate into the
    medicine wheel approach

  • Identify negative cognitions within a medicine wheel approach

  • Explain common negative and positive cognitions

  • Describe one culturally specific BLS technique known as “Eagle Wings Flapping”

  • Explain common negative and positive cognitions

  • Closing a session supporting the medicine wheel approach.

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(registered users only)

02 Presentation

03 Presentation
Historical trauma, First Nations Shame & Enhancing Resiliency

03 Presentation

Pre-recorded to watch at your convenience
Available on video On-Demand (6 months access to the recording)

Description

“Disconnection from our relatives” and how do we support resiliency “KAMOTAANA”

In the Blackfoot language this translates to an understanding of belief systems that allows one to “practice distance or escape from danger” and freedom of speech without judgment and gain insight into one’s shame.  

We will discuss strategies to support both therapists and clients healthy and unhealthy internalized beliefs pertaining to one’s own cultural identity.

Learning Objectives 

  • Discuss three contributors that therapists could overlook that adds to chronic shame for First Nation/minority clients.

  • Identify three strategies to support clients in dealing with chronic shame and suicidality.

  • Explain how to support clients online and telephone sessions utilizing different approaches such as somatic and EMDR approaches.

  • Explain how the complexities that affect First Nation/minority clients that contributes to shame in everyday life.

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(registered users only)

04 Presentation
Broken Connections and False Courage:
How to mentor kindness “Kimmapiiypitsinni”

Pre-recorded to watch at your convenience
Available on video On-Demand (6 months access to the recording)

Description

Omatskaohsi – one surrenders, gives up on life, values and belief systems. The addiction provides a false courage. Therapist will explore different strategies to support clients in finding themselves (to have kindness for oneself).

Learning Objectives 

  • Identify the factors that can increase First Nations' vulnerability to developing an addictive disorder.

  • Analyze the ACE study in relation to First Nations individuals

  • List two First Nations Trauma informed approaches when addressing addictive disorders

  • Demonstrate an history taking that allows therapist to explore historical issues that impact the client in everyday life.

  • Discuss three strategies to support clients during stabilization

Access the recording
(registered users only)

04 Presentation

05 Presentation
Suicide and Self-harming Behaviors

05 Presentation

Pre-recorded to watch at your convenience
Available on video On-Demand (6 months access to the recording)

Description

When one wants to self destroy commit suicide “SSKOHTOISTOTOOHSIS”

The discussion and content in this part of the webinar series may elicit discomfort and shock.  Unfortunately many of our First Nation/Indigenous people have come to normalize Suicide thoughts, actions and self-harm in 2021.  Many of our people struggle with an internal hopelessness due to emotional, physical, environmental, spiritual conditions that one often doesn’t have a choice but to endure.  This part of the webinar goals is  To Educate and Inform families and youth clients about the WHY of youth suicide, risk and protective factors, warning signs and clues, cultural interventions, and potential harm reduction strategies to implement healthy holistic coping skills.

Learning Objectives 

  • Identify First Nation Suicide risk factors in an informed, culturally relevant, and sensitive way. 

  • Describe the nature of youth suicide, the risk and protective factors, warning signs, clues, and appropriate intervention steps

  • Identify risk utilizing the ecological model of risk and protection.

  • Identify cultural interventions supporting a holistic approach to healing.

  • Demonstrate how does a front line support worker, therapist, teacher encourage, mentor raise the levels of hope and overall resilience in  their clients.

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(registered users only)

06 Presentation
How to Integrate the Polyvagal Theory When Working with First Nations Clients

Pre-recorded to watch at your convenience
Available on video On-Demand (6 months access to the recording)

Learning Objectives 

  • Describe the “Porges” Polyvagal therapeutic model.

  • Identify three holistic approaches to integrate into practice.

  • Explain one therapeutic art approach known as the “Tree of Life” teaching how one’s nervous system can stabilize with holistic practices.

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(registered users only)

06 Presentation

07 Presentation
Attachment and the Search for Connections

07 Presentation

Pre-recorded to watch at your convenience
Available on video On-Demand (6 months access to the recording)

Description

What is all the talk about when it comes to the barriers of Attachment within Indigenous peoples?

Participant will have an awareness of how John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth theories on attachment play a role in the story of what happened versus what is wrong with survivors of residential school era, sixties scoop era, foster care system to present day challenges.
Residential School Survivor Elder Moses Spear Chief will co present with Shelley Spear Chief.

Learning Objectives 

  • Explain how familial and community violence connects to various attachment styles

  • Explain how a well-known model of needs was practiced amongst various First Nation peoples

  • Demonstrate culturally appropriate assessment & interventions

  • Discuss attachment styles and their relation to interpersonal violence, domestic violence, and cyber violence

  • Summarize attachment story and what happened; foster care/adoption/residential school history/incarceration/disconnection from self and community/disconnection from cultural beliefs/disconnection from family.

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(registered users only)

08 Presentation
Working with First Nations Families

Pre-recorded to watch at your convenience
Available on video On-Demand (6 months access to the recording)

Description

Therapists will learn a beginning knowledge about the challenges that often impact First Nation children and youth and their parents. The presentation will include cultural differences and three interventions to support the therapeutic relationship. Considerations to include when utilizing online counselling and EMDR with children and youth.

Learning Objectives 

  • Describe some of the historical challenges First Nation children experience due to the transmission of intergenerational trauma.

  • Explain how the child welfare system disrupts attachment

  • Discuss three strategies to apply when working with children and youth that include different approaches such as somatic and EMDR techniques.

  • Demonstrate culturally appropriate interventions - Drumming, Split Feather Syndrome, and Naming ceremony 

Access the recording
(registered users only)

08 Presentation

09 Presentation
Barriers to Treatment

09 Presentation

Pre-recorded to watch at your convenience
Available on video On-Demand (6 months access to the recording)

Learning Objectives 

  • Identify how historical complexed trauma has impacted clients ability to authentically trust support people.

  • Identify three common blunders (Dr. Sandra Paulsen) that is often perpetuated by dominant cultured supports in dealing with various kinds of loss.

  • Explain the necessity of self-care when working with complexed trauma and grief.

  • Describe successful healing relationships within mainstream mental health settings 

  • List challenges and barriers first nation peoples face in everyday life and how dissociation affects their lives.

  • Utilize culturally appropriate interventions – Nanabush Story, Sweat Lodge, Elders, Healing Circles, Drumming, Smudging, the Medicine Wheel, Sandtray therapy

  • Describe how to integrate traditional healing strategies during Covid-19 and remote/online sessions

Access the recording
(registered users only)

10 Presentation
Wading Through the Insidious Effects of Stereotype Threat on Indigenous First Nations Youth

Pre-recorded to watch at your convenience
Available on video On-Demand (6 months access to the recording)

Description

This dialogue-based workshop will speak to the often hidden, overlooked, dismissed, and misunderstood factor of stereotype threat and how this experience can influence “WHY” Indigenous youth may struggle with academics, social engagement, suicide, hopelessness, and overall mental health in their day-to-day environments.

 

Presenters will discuss the importance of recognizing the internal effects of stereotype threat and how its experience can impact the cognitive functioning, performance, self-esteem, and overall mental health of Indigenous youth. While the dialogue will be based on research focused on youth experiences in school environments, stereotype threat can be experienced by many different groups of people including people who identify as BIPOC people, women, people with disabilities, 2SLGBTQ+ community, people with mental illness, and immigrant populations.

 

Understanding the existence of stereotype threat and its effects on functioning have important clinical implications and will extend participant’s ability to accurately understand and intervene with diverse clients who have been historically underserved and underrepresented.

Learning Objectives 

  • Gain awareness and increase ability to identify systemic challenges existing in colonizing systems.

  • Relate the effects of the finding of the unmarked graves and how it has exacerbated the symptoms of complexed grief.

  • Understanding and identifying the experience of stereotype threat within First Nation youth in an educational setting.

  • Understanding the internal cognitive processes that are activated when stereotype threat occurs.

  • How to identify when a student (or client) is experiencing stereotype threat?

  • How to implement a treatment plan and strategy of support.

Access the recording
(registered users only)

10 Presentation

11 Presentation
Crisis Intervention & Stabilization;
from theory to practice

11 Presentation

Pre-recorded to watch at your convenience
Available on video On-Demand (6 months access to the recording)

Access the recording
(registered users only)

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About Shelley Spear Chief, MCSW, EMDR Consultant

Shelley Spear Chief is a Clinical Social Worker who specializes in trauma and is a Leading First Nation Presenter on issues of historical trauma and utilizing traditional practices in counselling. She integrates her cultural ways of understanding and working with First Nation clients who have experienced trauma. Shelley has presented at the EMDR Canada conference as well as with Dr. Bruce Perry at the 2018 NMT International Symposium on Trauma. Shelley is currently in the process of writing a book on working with Indigenous peoples in collaboration with Dr. Sandra Paulsen. In addition, Shelley has presented many different workshops and training within several First Nation Communities teaching several topics related to trauma and dissociation. Shelley has taught within the University of Calgary social work program.

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About Moses Spear Chief, MSW, CD

Moses Spear Chief, Aastakana, member of the Kainai Nation and member of the Sacred Society known as the Horn Society. Moses specialized in a Masters of clinical social work with a minor in Addictions (Chemical Dependency) at Eastern Washington University. Moses obtained his education in Washington and worked in a variety of Native American agencies and implemented programs that supported a reclaiming of language (identity), belongingness, and connection with one’s own tribal identity. He was the former Director of Native American Studies Program within Browning Montana School District to support the implementation and revitalization of Blackfeet Language. Moses has been the director of a variety of First Nation/Native American treatment centers throughout Washington and Montana for youth and adults. He supported adult learning as a University and College instructor teaching social work/addictions/Blackfoot Language throughout Washington, Montana and Southern Alberta. Moses has been a dynamic knowledgeable advocate for residential school survivors and those struggling with addictions. Throughout his thirty plus year career, he was involved in the “Leave no child behind” policy development throughout the United States. In the past twelve years, Moses has been teaching Blackfoot Language to Middle School Youth along with advocating and support emotional wellness with his students.

BIO

Continuing Education (CE) Credits

Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA)   Eligible for 32 CE credits

CCPA has reviewed and approved the content of this Masterclass for 32 CEC.

 

This program does not qualify for CE credits/hours through National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC), American Psychological Association (APA), or Canadian Psychological Association (CPA).

Credits

START LEARNING : 

Once the purchase is completed, you will receive the login information within 48 hrs. Please ensure to check your junk/spam folder in case our email lands there.

Watch for an email from Envision - registration@envisionservices.ca

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FAQ

What are the requirements for obtaining CEs?

Participants must have paid the tuition fee, logged in at the start of the live interactive webinar and logged out at the end, and attended the entire webinar to receive a certificate. Failure to log in or out will result in forfeiture of credit for the entire webinar. No exceptions will be made. Partial credit is not available. Certificates will be available following webinar completion. If participants watch the recording (home study) version of the presentation, they will have access to Self-Study CE credits after completion of a short quiz.

Do I have to pay extra for CE credits?

No. The cost of CE credits is included with your workshop registration fee.​

If I cannot attend live, can I still get CE credits?

Yes. You can access the recording in the home study version, watch it in its entirety, and then pass a quiz with a score of 75% or higher. After taking the quiz, you will be able to download a certificate as proof of completion.

How do I access the home study version when it becomes available?

You will be emailed 5 business days after the live event with instructions on how you can access Envision's online learning platform called Thinkific. Sign in to Thinkific: Locate the email and click on your personal sign-in link to set your password. You cannot locate the email we sent? Login through the Thinkific platform directly by clicking on the link below: https://envision-workshops.thinkific.com/ To login, use the email address you provided when you registered for the workshop. To create your password, click on "Forgot Password" and set up a password for your account. If you already have an account and password, use those credentials to login.

How long do I have to review the recording?

You will have 60 days to review the recording. The recording will be made available approximately (5) business days after the live workshop.

What is the refund policy?

Refunds on purchased tickets are available up until 15 days before the date of the live workshop. There is no refund after this date. Refunds will include the ticket price less a $50 processing fee for all refunds/price adjustments. *Prices subject to change. Refunds within 15 days of workshops will be in the form of a workshop credit. These credits do not expire.

If I have special needs or require accommodations, what do I do?

Email registration@envisionservices.ca at least five (5) business days prior to the live workshop to request accommodations or discuss your needs. Envision cannot ensure accommodations without adequate prior notification.

If I have a complaint or grievance, who do I contact?

Please email registration@envisionservices.ca. All grievances must be in writing and will be replied to within 5 - 10 business days.

Is there commercial support or a conflict of interest for this presentation?

There is no known conflict of interest for this program. Envision has not received any financial support for this program or its contents and will not receive any financial support prior to or during this program. Envision will disclose any potential conflicts at the beginning of the workshop.

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