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Artist: Simone McLeod

Trauma Informed Interventions

for Working with First Nation Clients: 

A Masterclass Series on Historical Trauma & Strategies Across the Life Span

$399 Early Bird Rate | Mar 2 onward $550

Presentations

Attend this event live, watch the recording, or both! (available for 45 days)

Presenter:

Shelley Pompana Spear Chief, MCSW, EMDR Consultant

**This presentation includes two-parts. Part 1 is a pre recorded presentation and part 2 is a live presentation that will be held on March 30th, 2021. 

“Disconnection from our relatives” and how do we support resiliency “KAMOTAANA”

In the Blackfoot language this translates to an understanding of belief systems that allows one to “practice distance or escape from danger” and freedom of speech without judgment and gain insight into one’s shame.  

 

We will discuss strategies to support both therapists and clients healthy and unhealthy internalized beliefs pertaining to one’s own cultural identity.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss three contributors that therapists could overlook that adds to chronic shame for First Nation/minority clients.

  • Identify three strategies to support clients in dealing with chronic shame and suicidality.

  • Explain how to support clients online and telephone sessions utilizing different approaches such as somatic and EMDR approaches.

  • Explain how the complexities that affect First Nation/minority clients that contributes to shame in everyday life.

 

During the live presentation, Shelley will review the concepts discussed in the pre-recorded presentation. There will be a question period to allow participants to gain a deeper understanding of the concepts that were presented.

  • Colonization and assimilation

  • Land dispossession

  • Loss of tradition, language and culture

  • Systemic discrimination and racism

  • Child Apprehension

  • Cultural appropriation, cultural misappropriation & cultural appreciation

  • Collective trauma within the community

  • Residential School Syndrome – PTSD

  • PTSD and intergenerational trauma

  • Diagnostic criteria for residential school syndrome

  • Signs and symptoms

  • Split feather syndrome

  • Healing: A complex trauma framework

  • What is Traditional Healing? Sweat Lodge, Elders & more.

Live presentation on March 30th, 2021

6 - 7 pm

  • Diagnostic criteria for residential school syndrome

  • Signs and symptoms

  • Split feather syndrome

7 - 7:15 pm: Break

7:15 - 8 pm

  • Healing: A complex trauma framework

  • What is Traditional Healing? Sweat Lodge, Elders & more.

 

The Neurobiology of Historical Trauma

April 6 & 13th, 2021 | 5:30 - 8:30 PM MDT both days

Now offering 10 days access to the recording for those who can't attend live events ****

Presenter:

Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph.D

What We Have Always Known: The Wisdom of the Elders and The Neurosequential Model

During this training, Dr. Perry will review the core elements of healing in traditional First Nations and other Indigenous cultures.  The focus on 1) rhythm and regulation; 2) connectedness to community and nature and 3) meaning and purpose are all similar to the core elements of the Neurosequential Model.  Transgenerational trauma and resilience will be discussed. He will reinforce learned historical practices and parenting skills passed on through native people’s ancestry – generation to generation, and he will address the importance and need for extended families and the benefits of reweaving social fabric as an essential element of creating a healthy community, families and individuals in both Western and more traditional communities. 

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss an overview of key principles of neurodevelopment crucial for understanding the role of experience in defining functional and physical organization of the brain

  • Identify the potential of patterned rhythmic experiences to regulate and reorganize brain functioning within a Neurosequential framework 

  • Describe the power of positive relational interactions to help promote healing and healthy development for both the normal and maltreated child and point out parallels to indigenous culture’s value on connectedness

  • Explain parallels between core principles of the Neurosequential Model and core values of First Nations and Indigenous traditions.

Day 1: April 6, 2021

5:30 - 6 pm MDT

Shelley Pompana Spear Chief will provide an introduction to Dr. Perry's presentation

6 – 7 PM MDT

  •  Principles of Brain Organization and Development               

  •  Why Use a Neurodevelopmental Perspective?

  • Key Principles Underlying Trauma-related problems

    • Plasticity

    • Use-dependent change

    • Architecture of monoamine systems in the brain

  • Neurodevelopment

                       

7 - 8 PM MDT

  • Relational Health and Development                                   

    • Neurosociology

    • Relational poverty

    • Relational neurobiology and reward

  • Parallels to core values of indigenous cultures: Connectedness

8 - 8:30 PM MDT

Q & A with Shelley Pompana Spear Chief

Day 2: April 13, 2021

5:30 - 6 pm MDT

Shelley Pompana Spear Chief will provide an introduction to Dr. Perry's presentation

6 – 7 PM MDT

  • The Impact of Abuse, Neglect and Chaos

    • Core adaptations to threat

    • Hyperarousal and dissociation

    • Neglect related complications of primary traumatic symptoms

  • Diagnostic problems with traumatized children

                       

7 - 8 PM MDT

  • Implications for Therapeutic Work, Intervention and Prevention

  • Rationale for power of regulation and rhythm in therapeutic work

  • Implications for front-line caregivers

  • Understanding behaviors

  • Addressing behaviors

  • What heals children?

  • Creating the therapeutic web

8 - 8:30 PM MDT

Q & A with Shelley Pompana Spear Chief

 
 

Attend this event live, watch the recording, or both! (available for 45 days)

Presenter:

Arianne Struik, Clinical Psychologist, EMDR Consultant

Many First Nation People struggle with the consequences of chronic traumatization, which has led to serious health and mental health issues throughout multiple generations. Traditional, cultural and spiritual ways of healing have sometimes not been sufficient to heal, leading to unhealthy ways of coping such as overeating, alcohol, drugs, (sexual) violence. This then affects the next generation and their children grow up around violence, abuse and neglect.

In remote areas of Western Australia, 98% of the children in care are First Nation Children and in collaboration with their elders, families and Child Protection Services a treatment model has been developed to provide integrated trauma treatment to First Nation children and their families. Trauma treatment consists of psychoeducation, increasing safety, stabilization and processing traumatic memories with EMDR, combined with customized traditional ways of healing and spiritual healing. The EMDR therapy process has a lot of similarities with cultural ways of healing and can easily be adapted to the cultural context and combined with traditional ways of healing. Integration of both provides a more solid base for healing with great outcomes.

This presentation will outline the basics of a trauma treatment model, how it can be delivered and adapted to the different cultural and spiritual ways of healing. Treatment starts with an invitation from the First Nation People and discussions on how the treatment model can be customized to fit the clients’ specific needs and ways, as one shoe does not fit all sizes. Questions that can be discussed are: what are the goals of this treatment, who needs to be involved, which people will participate in the trauma treatment, are there any children, and what kind of trauma needs to be healed, what are traditional ways of healing and how can they be integrated, is there a need to increase safety, is there a wish for psychoeducation, how can the clients be supported, what are traditional ways of support, is there a need to work on stabilizing, how and where can the trauma processing session be done, what is needed after and how to debrief and make further plans.

EMDR therapy can be delivered in an intensive treatment model where the EMDR clinician flies into the remote location for several days to provide daily EMDR sessions combined with family/caregivers support for children and cultural or spiritual healing. The often-remote locations of these clients can make it difficult to access specialized trauma treatment. By providing treatment in a fly-in-fly-out (FIFO) model, specialized trauma treatment become available for many more clients in remote areas. In addition to that, it can feel safer for First Nation People when the processing of the actual traumatic memories is done by someone from outside the community. This presentation will outline how to set up and conduct intensive EMDR therapy in remote locations with First Nation People. At the end of the intensive, a plan is made for ongoing support and an online follow-up with local clinicians. In the weeks after the intensive evaluation and support is provided and if needed another intensive can be planned. This collaborative FIFO model enables clients to receive specialized treatment and ongoing support, but is also increases the knowledge of local clinicians on trauma and treatment possibilities such as EMDR.

Developed in 2014, this model has been used with First Nation children and adults across Australia and New Zealand. Child Protection Psychology Services in South Australia and Oranga Tamariki in New Zealand, have adopted this model to provide children in care living in remote areas with trauma treatment. Two documentaries have been made of this work and Arianne Struik will share her experiences in working with this model with children, adults, individuals, family systems and groups of First Nation People in Australia and New Zealand.

Learning objectives

  • Describe how to prepare treatment with local (first nation) clinicians, family elders and the clients if needed

  • Explain how to increase safety, assessing the client’s stability by analyzing their barriers for trauma processing

  • Discuss interventions to overcome barriers

  • Describe the FIFO model

  • Summarize how to set up and conduct intensive EMDR therapy in remote locations with First Nation People

5 - 6 pm: 

Introduction to the FIFO Model

Introduction with local clinicians and elders

 

Integration EMDR and Indigenous, cultural and spiritual ways of healing

Preparation of trauma treatment

Practical setup and planning

Type of trauma and relational damage

 

Identifying clients: children, adults, individual client, several individuals, group of clients affected by the same trauma, family affected by the same trauma

Analyzing potential barriers to trauma treatment with Sleeping Dogs method

6 - 6:30 pm:

Interventions to overcome barriers

Assessing safety

Psychoeducation options

Support and network

6:30 - 6:45 pm:

Break

6:45 pm - 7:45 pm: 

Intensive EMDR therapy in remote locations with First Nation People

 

EMDR therapy

 

Indigenous, cultural and spiritual ways of healing

 

Support during and around sessions

Closure

Follow up 

7:45 pm - 8 pm:

Closure and Q & A

Broken Connections and False Courage:

How to mentor kindness “Kimmapiiypitsinni”

On-Demand

This event is pre-recorded to watch at your convenience (available for 45 days)

Presenter:

Shelley Pompana Spear Chief, MCSW, EMDR Consultant

Omatskaohsi – one surrenders, gives up on life, values and belief systems. The addiction provides a false courage. Therapist will explore different strategies to support clients in finding themselves (to have kindness for oneself).

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the factors that can increase First Nations' vulnerability to developing an addictive disorder.

  • Analyze the ACE study in relation to First Nations individuals

  • List two First Nations Trauma informed approaches when addressing addictive disorders

  • Demonstrate an history taking that allows therapist to explore historical issues that impact the client in everyday life.

  • Discuss three strategies to support clients during stabilization

 
 

Suicide and Self-harming Behaviors

April 15th, 2021 | 6 - 8 PM MDT

Attend this event live, watch the recording, or both! (available for 45 days)

Presenter:

Shelley Pompana Spear Chief, MCSW, EMDR Consultant

When one wants to self destroy commit suicide “SSKOHTOISTOTOOHSIS”

The discussion and content in this part of the webinar series may elicit discomfort and shock.  Unfortunately many of our First Nation/Indigenous people have come to normalize Suicide thoughts, actions and self-harm in 2021.  Many of our people struggle with an internal hopelessness due to emotional, physical, environmental, spiritual conditions that one often doesn’t have a choice but to endure.  This part of the webinar goals is  To Educate and Inform families and youth clients about the WHY of youth suicide, risk and protective factors, warning signs and clues, cultural interventions, and potential harm reduction strategies to implement healthy holistic coping skills.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify First Nation Suicide risk factors in an informed, culturally relevant, and sensitive way. 

  • Describe the nature of youth suicide, the risk and protective factors, warning signs, clues, and appropriate intervention steps

  • Identify risk utilizing the ecological model of risk and protection.

  • Identify cultural interventions supporting a holistic approach to healing.

  • Demonstrate how does a front line support worker, therapist, teacher encourage, mentor raise the levels of hope and overall resilience in  their clients.

 

6 - 6:45 pm

  • Learn differences in assessing for suicidal risk

  • Identify different self-harming behaviours in First Nation individuals

  • Learn common and different interventions for self-harm and suicidal ideation.

6:45- 7 pm

Break

 

7 - 8 pm

  • Identify two different types of loss resulting in complex historical grief

  • Gain an awareness of how to integrate spiritual holistic practices for loss.

  • Identify two treatment approaches: EMDR and Art approaches.

 

This event is pre-recorded to watch at your convenience (available for 45 days)

Presenters:

Dr. Sandra Paulsen &

Shelley Pompana Spear Chief, MCSW, EMDR Consultant

​Description

In working with the First People, complex trauma is ubiquitous.  However, dissociation manifests both similarly and differently than in dominant culture clients. This workshop will offer some basic principles of ego state work, and address how the work might be different with this population. It will discussion assessment strategies and cultural challenges to the validity of assessment. The lecture will offer tactics for addressing working with a divided self. 

Learning objectives

  • Identify six common mistakes which can interfere with trust and rapport, thereby confounding assessment and treatment of complex trauma with First Nations clients.

  • Utilize an interview method to help identify the presence of structural dissociation.

  • Identify four ego state maneuvers to deconflictualize self systems in First Nations clients. 

Attachment and the search for Connections

April 10th, 2021 | 9 am - 1 PM MDT

Attend this event live, watch the recording, or both! (available for 45 days)

Presenters:

Moses Spear Chief, MSW, CDP &

Shelley Pompana Spear Chief, MCSW, EMDR Consultant

What is all the talk about when it comes to the barriers of Attachment within Indigenous peoples?

Participant will have an awareness of how John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth theories on attachment play a role in the story of what happened versus what is wrong with survivors of residential school era, sixties scoop era, foster care system to present day challenges.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain how familial and community violence connects to various attachment styles

  • Explain how a well-known model of needs was practiced amongst various First Nation peoples

  • Demonstrate culturally appropriate assessment & interventions

  • Discuss attachment styles and their relation to interpersonal violencedomestic violence, and cyber violence

  • Summarize attachment story and what happened; foster care/adoption/residential school history/incarceration/disconnection from self and community/disconnection from cultural beliefs/disconnection from family.

9 - 10 am:

  • Theories of attachment

  • Culturally Appropriate Assessment & Interventions

10 - 10:30 am  - Attachment Styles

10:30 -10:45 am - Break

10:45 - 11:45 am

  • Interpersonal violence

  • Domestic violence 

  • Cyber violence

11:45 - 12 pm - Death, grief, and loss

12 - 12:30 pm - Attachment story

12:30 - 1 pm: Closure and Q & A

 

This event is pre-recorded to watch at your convenience (available for 45 days)

Presenter:

Shelley Pompana Spear Chief, MCSW, EMDR Consultant

How to integrate polyvagal when working with First Nations/Indigenous clients.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the “Porges” Polyvagal therapeutic model.

  • Identify three holistic approaches to integrate into practice.

  • Explain one therapeutic art approach known as the “Tree of Life” teaching how one’s nervous system can stabilize with holistic practices.

 

 

This event is pre-recorded to watch at your convenience (available for 45 days)

Presenter:

Shelley Spear Chief, MCSW, EMDR Consultant

Therapists will learn a beginning knowledge about the challenges that often impact First Nation children and youth and their parents. The presentation will include cultural differences and three interventions to support the therapeutic relationship. Considerations to include when utilizing online counselling and EMDR with children and youth.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe some of the historical challenges First Nation children experience due to the transmission of intergenerational trauma.

  • Explain how the child welfare system disrupts attachment

  • Discuss three strategies to apply when working with children and youth that include different approaches such as somatic and EMDR techniques.

  • Demonstrate culturally appropriate interventions - DrummingSplit Feather Syndrome, and Naming ceremony 

 
 

Attend this event live, watch the recording, or both! (available for 45 days)

Presenter:

Shelley Spear Chief, MCSW, EMDR Consultant

Learning Objectives

  • Identify how historical complexed trauma has impacted clients ability to authentically trust support people.

  • Identify three common blunders (Dr. Sandra Paulsen) that is often perpetuated by dominant cultured supports in dealing with various kinds of loss.

  • Explain the necessity of self-care when working with complexed trauma and grief.

  • Describe successful healing relationships within mainstream mental health settings 

  • List challenges and barriers first nation peoples face in everyday life and how dissociation affects their lives.

  • Utilize culturally appropriate interventions – Nanabush Story, Sweat Lodge, Elders, Healing Circles, Drumming, Smudging, the Medicine Wheel, Sandtray therapy

  • Describe how to integrate traditional healing strategies during Covid-19 and remote/online sessions

 

Click to Register

Your Facilitator

Shelley Spear Chief

MCSW, EMDR Consultant

Shelley is a Clinical Social Worker who specializes in trauma and is a Leading First Nation Presenter on issues of historical trauma and utilizing traditional practices in counselling. She integrates her cultural ways of understanding and working with First Nation clients who have experienced trauma.

Shelley has presented at the EMDR Canada conference as well as with Dr. Bruce Perry at the 2018 NMT International Symposium on Trauma. Shelley is currently in the process of writing a book on working with Indigenous peoples in collaboration with Dr. Sandra Paulsen. Shelley will also be presenting with Dr. Sandra Paulsen at the Trauma and Dissociative Conference in April 2021 & at the EMDR Canada Conference in Niagara on the Lake. In addition, Shelley has presented many different workshops and training within several First Nation Communities teaching several topics related to trauma and dissociation. Shelley has taught within the University of Calgary social work program.

Guest Speakers

Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph.D.

Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph.D. is Principal of The Neurosequential Model Network, LLC and Senior Fellow of The ChildTrauma Academy, a Community of Practice based in Houston, TX.  He is also Professor (Adjunct) in the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago and the School of Allied Health, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Dr. Perry is the author of over 500 journal articles, book chapters and scientific proceedings. His clinical research over the last ten years has been focused on integrating emerging principles of developmental neuroscience into clinical practice. This work has resulted in the development of innovative clinical practices and programs working with maltreated and traumatized children, most prominently the Neurosequential Model©, a developmentally sensitive, neurobiology-informed approach to clinical work (NMT), education (NME) and caregiving (NMC).

 
 

Moses Spear Chief, MSW, CDP

Moses Spear Chief, Aastakana, member of the Kainai Nation and member of the Sacred Society known as the Horn Society.  Moses specialized in a Masters of clinical social work with a minor in Addictions (Chemical Dependency) at Eastern Washington University. Moses obtained his education in Washington and worked in a variety of Native American agencies and implemented programs that supported a reclaiming of language (identity), belongingness, and connection with one’s own tribal identity.  He was the former Director of Native American Studies Program within Browning Montana School District to support the implementation and revitalization of Blackfeet Language. Moses has been the director of a variety of First Nation/Native American treatment centers throughout Washington and Montana for youth and adults.  He supported adult learning as a University and College instructor teaching social work/addictions/Blackfoot Language throughout Washington, Montana and Southern Alberta. 

Moses has been a dynamic knowledgeable advocate for residential school survivors and those struggling with addictions.  Throughout his thirty plus year career, he was involved in the “Leave no child behind” policy development throughout the United States.   In the past twelve years, Moses has been teaching Blackfoot Language to Middle School Youth along with advocating and support emotional wellness with his students. 

 

Dr. Sandra Paulsen

Dr Sandra Paulsen (Ph.D.) is co-editor of “The Neurobiology & Treatment of Traumatic Dissociation: Toward an Embodied Self” (2014), and author of, “Looking Through the Eyes of Trauma & Dissociation: An Illustrated Guide for EMDR Therapists and Clients.” She is a fellow of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation. She was invited faculty at the First and Third World Congresses of Ego State Therapy in Germany, 2003 and South Africa, 2010, Japan EMDR Conference 2010, Masters Series Lecturer at EMDRIA conference in Toronto, 2004. She wrote chapters in Corsini’s Encyclopedia of Psychology and Handbook of Innovative Psychotherapy, and in Shapiro’s Solutions II, Forgash’s Healing the Heart of Trauma, and Luber’s EMDR Scripted Protocols.

 

She has collaborated with John G. Watkins, originator of ego state therapy. She was Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Hawaii; and Acting Chief Psychologist at Queens Medical Center in Honolulu. She now lives and works on Bainbridge Island, near Seattle, specializing in intensive treatment for early trauma and attachment injuries.

  

 For more information about Dr. Sandra Paulsen you can visit her website www.bainbridgepsychology.com

Arianne Struik, Clinical Psychologist, EMDR Consultant

Arianne Struik is a clinical psychologist, family therapist and EMDR practitioner and consultant, originally from the Netherlands. She worked in Child and Adolescent Mental Health for twenty-two years as a clinical psychologist and program director. She moved to Australia and became director of The Institute for Chronically Traumatized Children (ICTC) from which she provides specialized trauma treatment in remote areas, as well as workshops, training, supervision and research. She developed the award-winning Sleeping Dogs method, described in the second edition of the book Treating Chronically Traumatized Children (Struik, 2019) and teaches internationally on the treatment of trauma and dissociation in children. She is member of the European ISSTD Child and Adolescent Committee, the former convenor of the national committee of the Australian Psychological Society EMDR therapy Interest Group and the facilitator of the peergroup for EMDR therapists working with Indigenous client.

  

 For more information about Arianne Struik you can visit her website https://ariannestruik.com/

CE Overview

 
 

Eligible for 18 CE hours:

 

Cosponsored by R. Cassidy Seminars, P.O. Box 14473, Santa Rosa, CA 95405

An extra fee of $40 applies for those wanting the CEUs. 

Psychologists
R. Cassidy Seminars is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists.  R. Cassidy Seminars maintains responsibility for this program and its content. 18 CE hours
NY: R. Cassidy Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0018. 18 clock hours. Live online

Psychoanalysts
NY: R. Cassidy Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychoanalysts. #P-0005.
18 clock hours. Live online.

Social Workers
CA and Other States: Most states accept continuing education courses offered by either CE Sponsors for APA, (which R. Cassidy Seminars is) or will accept the approval of other state licensing boards of the same license type. Some states, either do not require pre-approval of courses, or will allow licensees to retroactively file for course approval themselves. Check with your board to obtain a final ruling.

 

IL-SWs: Illinois Dept of Professional Regulation, Approved Continuing Education Sponsor, #159.000785. 
18 CE hours.
NY: R. Cassidy Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider (#0006) of continuing education for licensed social workers. This program is approved for 18 contact hours Live online.
OH: Provider approved by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker and Marriage and Family Therapist Board for
18 clock hours, #RCST110701

Counselors/Marriage and Family Therapists
CA and Other States: Most states accept continuing education courses offered by approved providers with national providerships or will accept the approvals of other state licensing boards of the same license type. Others, either do not require pre-approval of courses, or will allow licensees to retroactively file for course approval themselves. R. Cassidy Seminars is an approved provider with two national providerships, as well as holding many individual state license type approvals. Check with your board to obtain a final ruling.
IL-MFTs: Illinois Dept of Professional Regulation, Approved Continuing Education Sponsor, #168-000141. 
18 hours.
NY-LMHCs: R. Cassidy Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board of Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors. #MHC-0015. 18 contact hours. Live online.
NY-LMFTs: R. Cassidy Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board of Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists. #MFT-0011. 18 contact hours. Live online.
OH: Provider approved by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker and Marriage and Family Therapist Board for
18 clock hours, #RCST110701
TX: Approved CE Sponsor through the Texas State Board of Examiners of Marriage & Family Therapists. Provider #151 18 CE hours.

Creative Arts Therapists
NY: R. Cassidy Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board of Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed creative arts therapists, #CAT-0005. 18 contact hours. Live online.

Chemical Dependency Counselors
CA: Provider approved by CCAPP, Provider #4N-00-434-0555 for 18 CEHs. CCAPP is an ICRC member which has reciprocity with most ICRC member states
TX: Provider approved by the TCBAP Standards Committee, Provider No. 1749-06, 5 hours general. Expires 3/31/5051.  Complaints about provider or workshop content may be directed to the TCBAP Standards Committee, 1005 Congress Avenue, Ste. 460, Austin, Texas 78701, Fax Number (515) 476-7597.

 

Educators
TX: R. Cassidy Seminars is an approved provider with the Texas Education Agency CPE# 501456. This course is 18 CE Hours.

 

Nurses
CA: Provider approved by the CA Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CeP15554, for 18 contact hours

Dentists
CA: R. Cassidy Seminars is a provider approved by the Dental Board of California as a registered provider of continuing education. RP# 4874 18 CE Hours.

Disability Access - If you require ADA accommodations please contact our office 30 days or more before the event. We cannot ensure accommodations without adequate prior notification.

Please Note: Licensing Boards change regulations often and while we attempt to stay abreast of their most recent changes, if you have questions or concerns about this course meeting your specific board’s approval, we recommend you contact your board directly to obtain a ruling.

 

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